Mobile bird identification
Bird Field Guide

Shoveler

Anas clypeata
Order: Anseriformes

Family: Anatidae

Genus:  Anas

Species: A. clypeata
Note the distinctive white breast and brown flanks of this Male Shoveler, at times the dark green head can look almost black.

The Male Shoveler is a distinctive bird with a large heavy bill, dark green head and brown flanks. Even in eclipse or juvenile plumage the large bill and long neck are usually enough to identify it. The Shoveler is a surface feeding duck.

Adult Male Winter
Distribution
Winter visitor
Resident bird
Resident
Summer
Passage Migrant
Passage
Winter
Summer visitor
Northern Shoveler distribution
General distribution:
Breeds mainly in Eastern Europe. Around 600 pair nest in the UK with numbers rising to 18,000 in the winter.
Notes:
Also known as the Northern Shoveler. Feeds on the surface of the water often by sweeping it's bill from side to side to filter the water.
Habitat:
The Shoveler breeds in reedy freshwater pools. In Winter it is much more widespread on freshwater pools and marshes but can also be found in sheltered estuaries and creeks.
The female Shoveler has a light brown streaked body, the large heavy bill and long neck are distinctive.
Thanks to:Bryan's bird photography
Identifying a Northern Shoveler

*White breast

Thanks to: http://photo-natur.de/;
* key ID points
Adult Female

*Rufous brown flanks

Male Shoveler duck flying
Identifying a Female Northern Shoveler
Identifying a Male Northern Shoveler

Streaked pale brown body

*Bill has orange sides

* key ID points
Thanks to:http://photo-natur.de/;

*Large heavy bill

Dark green head

 
Male and Female Shoveler
Wildfowl (Ducks)
Female Shoveler duck flying

Pale blue forewings (top), white underwing

Long neck

Pale blue forewings (top), white underwing

Long neck

*Large heavy bill

Thanks to:https://www.flickr.com/photos/decadiz/
Identifying a Male Northern Shoveler in Summer
Adult Male Summer (Eclipse)
In Summer the Male Shoveler is more like the female, however he has a darker head and the flanks are still slightly Rufous. The back is also darker than the female.